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Description

Mobile health (mHealth) applications (apps) have the potential to improve health behaviors and subsequently improve patient outcomes. Usability testing is fundamental to the uptake and efficacy of mHealth apps. Numerous methods to assess the usability of mHealth apps are available in the literature, thus selecting an appropriate method can be challenging. Additionally, usability testing may be particularly difficult among various disadvantaged populations particularly those with low socio-economic status (SES), minimal educational backgrounds, and older adults as these groups are more likely to have low functional and health literacy which can lead to difficulty using technology. In this didactic panel, four pre- and post-doctoral researchers will each discuss a discrete usability evaluation technique and case study to illustrate the use of each methodology for evaluating mHealth apps with disadvantaged groups with low health literacy. By the end of this panel, participants will be able to: 1) articulate the importance of usability evaluations, especially among disadvantaged groups; 2) differentiate between usability evaluation techniques; 3) describe evaluation techniques for achieving different levels of usability evaluations; and 4) select an appropriate usability evaluation method for mHealth apps in specific contexts with varying end-users.

Learning Objective 1: By the end of this panel, participants will be able to: 1) articulate the importance of usability evaluations, especially among low SES groups; 2) differentiate between usability evaluation techniques; 3) describe evaluation techniques for achieving different levels of usability evaluations; and 4) select an appropriate usability evaluation method for mHealth apps in specific contexts with varying end-users.

Authors:

Samantha Stonbraker (Presenter)
Columbia University School of Nursing

Elizabeth Heitkemper (Presenter)
Columbia University

Hwayoung Cho (Presenter)
Columbia University School of Nursing

Melissa Beauchemin (Presenter)
Columbia University School of Nursing

Rebecca Schnall (Presenter)
Columbia University School of Nursing

Presentation Materials:

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